Is it Worth Paying More for Health Insurance?

Health coverage may seem optional, especially if you're young or healthy. But catastrophic medical care can be incredibly expensive. Learn more about why it's important to have a plan to pay for unexpected medical care.

Is it Worth Paying More for Health Insurance?

If you're in good overall health, your annual costs without insurance could be considerably lower than what you would pay for insured health care. However, if you have a chronic illness or disability or end up in the emergency room, the money you spend on insurance could be worth it. Health coverage may seem optional, especially if you're young or healthy. Many people are not prone to getting sick or going to a doctor.

But catastrophic medical care can be incredibly expensive. In light of the recent pandemic, there is a strong argument for having a backup plan in case of an unexpected medical bill. That's why it's important to have a plan to pay for the high costs of unexpected medical care or in the event of an emergency. In addition, some employer-sponsored health plans combine high-deductible plans with a health savings account (HSA) to which your employer can contribute, and this account can be used to pay your deductible.

Millions of healthy people spend more time worrying about the health of their household budgets than they do budgeting for their health. To see all available qualified health plan options, visit the New Jersey health insurance marketplace at Get Covered NJ. The simple answer is “yes,” unless you can afford to pay medical bills of tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars out-of-pocket if your health unexpectedly worsens. The open enrollment season for health insurance is coming at a time when more people in the United States have health insurance than ever before.

While the ACA set a limit on what some people have to pay when they get sick, health plans often fail to keep people out of their medical debts, provide timely access to the health care they need, or ensure that people can afford the medicines they need to stay healthy. If there is no competition in their healthcare market, they have a role to play in supporting government efforts to break local monopolies or regulate prices, such as Maryland's all-payer model for reducing provider prices and regulating the Rhode Island insurance market to curb the growth of healthcare spending. These are the obvious reasons for the decline in popularity of health insurance and the emergence of notable alternatives to health insurance, specifically an innovative approach known as “sharing medical costs”.

Yvonne Wertheim
Yvonne Wertheim

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